Press Advisories

Being the Good Samaritan Isn’t Enough

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017

Being the Good Samaritan Isn't Enough

By Irene R. DeMaris, M.Div.

A legal expert stood up to test Jesus. “Teacher,” he said, “what must I do to gain eternal life?” Jesus replied, “What is written in the Law? How do you interpret it?” He responded, “You must love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your being, with all your strength, and with all your mind, and love your neighbor as yourself.” Jesus said to him, “You have answered correctly. Do this and you will live.”

But the legal expert wanted to prove that he was right, so he said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”

Jesus replied, “A man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho. He encountered thieves, who stripped him naked, beat him up, and left him near death. Now it just so happened that a priest was also going down the same road. When he saw the injured man, he crossed over to the other side of the road and went on his way. Likewise, a Levite came by that spot, saw the injured man, and crossed over to the other side of the road and went on his way. A Samaritan, who was on a journey, came to where the man was. But when he saw him, he was moved with compassion. The Samaritan went to him and bandaged his wounds, tending them with oil and wine. Then he placed the wounded man on his own donkey, took him to an inn, and took care of him. The next day, he took two full days’ worth of wages and gave them to the innkeeper. He said, ‘Take care of him, and when I return, I will pay you back for any additional costs.’ What do you think? Which one of these three was a neighbor to the man who encountered thieves?”

Then the legal expert said, “The one who demonstrated mercy toward him.” Jesus told him, “Go and do likewise.”

This Sunday at my church, the Rev. Dr. Luke Powery, the Dean of Duke University Chapel, preached for our Martin Luther King, Jr. Sunday. His words were prophetic and courageous, I quickly took notes and there is one part of his sermon that struck a nerve with me. He talked about the Good Samaritan, that it was a good first action, but not the last step in seeking justice. Powery brought up that we needed to know why the road was so violent, what was the systemic reasons behind this. How come the others didn’t stop, why did the Samaritan have to pay so much out of pocket to heal the man? He opened up the parable for me and as I sat down to write about the ACA and how it affects women’s reproductive health, I can’t get it out of my head.

Last week we learned that 91% of the 115th Congress identifies as Christian thanks to the Pew Research Center. The religion of the prolific healer, Jesus Christ who healed those who needed him. Yet, in the same week in the dead of the night last week, the U.S. Senate begun its work dismantling the Affordable Healthcare Act and taking us backwards from the Gospel. In a space of Christian majority, the Gospel did not flourish.

We also know now, there are ten senators who identify as United Methodists and eight of them voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act: Jeff Sessions, Tom Cotton, Johnny Isakson, David Perdue, Pat Roberts, John Kennedy, Richard Burr, and Rob Portman. (It is worth noting, two United Methodist senators voted against: Elizabeth Warren and Debbie Stabenow.)

Some of our United Methodist siblings voted against our neighbor. Those we are in communion with, who verbally join in our baptismal covenant, yet do the opposite. What are we to do? Our neighbors who are about to lose their healthcare are hurting at the hands of our siblings.

The stories have flooded our news feeds of people who will be directly affected by the repeal of the Affordable Healthcare Act. They grow by the day. You may even have your personal story. As I listen, it’s hard not to lose hope. The ACA was not perfect, it was a first step like the Good Samaritan caring for the man on the side of the road to Jericho. Repealing the ACA is walking by one of God’s beloved children in pain and not doing a damn thing.

Instead of repealing it, we should be addressing it and the systemic issues regarding health care. Why profit comes before people. Why a group of overwhelmingly Christians are ignoring Jesus’ words and actions. A group who knows that the most vulnerable is disproportionately affected by these changes.

I think another part of the parable’s lesson for me is that we also need to call to task the priest and the Levite who walked past the injured man on the road to Jericho. We need to hold those in our communion, who join our baptismal covenant to our Wesleyan heritage of radical love, grace, and justice.

As we move forward into the fight to maintain the ACA, instead of strengthening it, I will leave you with The Social Principles section on Right to Health Care:

Health is a condition of physical, mental, social, and spiritual well-being. John 10:10b says, “I came so that they could have life—indeed, so that they could live life to the fullest.” Stewardship of health is the responsibility of each person to whom health has been entrusted. Creating the personal, environmental, and social conditions in which health can thrive is a joint responsibility—public and private. We encourage individuals to pursue a healthy lifestyle and affirm the importance of preventive health care, health education, environmental and occupational safety, good nutrition, and secure housing in achieving health. Health care is a basic human right.

Providing the care needed to maintain health, prevent disease, and restore health after injury or illness is a responsibility each person owes others and government owes to all, a responsibility government ignores at its peril. In Ezekiel 34:4a, God points out the failures of the leadership of Israel to care for the weak: “You don’t strengthen the weak, heal the sick, bind up the injured, bring back the strays, or seek out the lost.” As a result all suffer. Like police and fire protection, health care is best funded through the government’s ability to tax each person equitably and directly fund the provider entities. Countries facing a public health crisis such as HIV/AIDS must have access to generic medicines and to patented medicines. We affirm the right of men and women to have access to comprehensive reproductive health/family planning information and services that will serve as a means to prevent unplanned pregnancies, reduce abortions, and prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS. The right to health care includes care for persons with brain diseases, neurological conditions, or physical disabilities, who must be afforded the same access to health care as all other persons in our communities. It is unjust to construct or perpetuate barriers to physical or mental wholeness or full participation in community.

We believe it is a governmental responsibility to provide all citizens with health care.

We encourage hospitals, physicians, and medical clinics to provide access to primary health care to all people regardless of their health-care coverage or ability to pay for treatment.

Being the Good Samaritan isn’t enough, moving backwards from the Gospel is also not acceptable. As people of faith, we must protect our siblings who are on the precipice of losing their healthcare. All hands are needed on the road to Jericho. It’s time to stand up and act.

Call the United Methodist Senators who are actively trying to repeal the ACA today!

Senator Jeff Sessions: (202) 224-4124

Senator Tom Cotton: (202) 224-2353

Senator Johnny Isakson: (202) 224-3643

Senator David Perdue: (202) 224-3521

Senator Pat Roberts: (202) 224-4774

Senator John Kennedy: (202) 224-4623

Senator Richard Burr: (202) 224-3154

Senator Rob Portman: (202) 224-3353

 

Irene R. DeMaris, M.Div. is a feminist, lifelong member of The United Methodist Church, and former MFSA intern who advocates for women’s health through a faith-based lens.

MFSA Statement on Recent US Election

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016

Dear Justice Seekers,

For 109 years, MFSA has been a prophetic voice for justice-seeking people of faith in The United Methodist Church, in our nation and the world. We will continue to be that voice. We are a voice for peace with justice in Israel and Palestine. We are a voice working against racism and white privilege. We are a voice for reproductive health and justice. We are a voice for a healthy planet. We are a voice against colonialism, militarism, and misuse of power. We are a voice of inclusion for all God’s children, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity. We are a voice that welcomes our migrant neighbor. But most importantly, we are a voice at the crossroads where these concerns for justice intersect.

We believe the recent decisions made by President-elect Trump with respect to leadership in his administration speak against the very foundation of our justice seeking faith. We are alarmed. We believe these individuals have not shown the necessary skills for leadership and whose past words and actions have not represented the values of civilized society. As justice-seeking people of faith, we stand opposed to not only one individual, but the emerging pattern that President-elect Trump is building a cabinet founded on white supremacy, fear, and bigotry.

MFSA calls our church to expand its understanding of the radical call of the Gospel to be an inclusive, justice-seeking, risk-taking Body of Christ. We live out our belief that to be faithful witnesses to the Gospel of Jesus Christ is to be involved in the transformation of the social order. Therefore, we call The United Methodist Church, the Council of Bishops, congregations, and its members to join us in taking active steps to publicly “resist evil, injustice, and oppression in whatever forms they present themselves.”

Experiences of injustice do not happen in a vacuum, and therefore it is imperative to: develop the most effective strategies to create space for understanding privilege; organize in an intersectional framework led by marginalized communities; and build effective systems of resistance and cooperation to take action for justice. We invite you to join us in this work.

We invite United Methodist leadership including our bishops, clergy, and lay leaders to join us in signing the “Faith Leaders Call on Republican officials to reject Mr. Trump’s Cabinet of Bigotry” letter distributed by Faith in Public Life. You can find the link here: https://goo.gl/J9zXSx

We call on all Justice-Seeking People of Faith to join us by:

  • Contacting your legislators to express as a justice seeking person of faith your concern that the leadership of our nation must reflect justice for all people.
  • Speaking and working against the narrative that privileged communities are being oppressed when they are asked to acknowledge the ways their privilege perpetuates bias and injustice.
  • Committing to create opportunities for education and advocacy to publicly and actively resist white supremacy, white privilege, and implicit bias in your communities.

If you are so moved, we invite you to support the work of the Methodist Federation for Social Action, so we can continue to be a voice for justice for all people.

Seeking Justice Together,

The Staff and Board of Directors, Methodist Federation for Social Action

MFSA Condemns Racism at United Methodist Youth Event

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016
MFSA Condemns Racism at United Methodist Youth Event
November 15, 2016
 
The Methodist Federation for Social Action (MFSA) condemns the acts of racism that took place at the Pilgrimage youth event sponsored by the North Carolina Annual Conference. The recent U.S. Presidential Election has drawn back the veil and emboldened the hate based bigotry built into the very foundation of the United States. We furthermore condemn the acts of racism, xenophobia, sexism, homophobia, islamophobia and antisemitism that have increased in recent days. Therefore we call The United Methodist Church, the Council of Bishops, congregations, and its members to take active steps to publicly “resist evil, injustice, and oppression in whatever forms they present themselves."
 
MFSA believes all experiences of marginalization and injustice are interconnected because the struggle for justice is tied to concepts of power and privilege.  We recognize that injustice works on multiple and simultaneous levels.  From our earliest days, we identified as a movement energizing people to be agents of sacred change in the church and the world. We believe that the root of justice lies within people of faith in grassroots communities called to engage in collective liberation. It requires storied relationships, resilience in the midst of oppression, and resistance to all that stands in the way of love. Our lived experience tells us sacred change is only possible in a movement that is boundary breaking and refuses to be silenced by the powers and principalities that use a call for unity as a veil for discrimination.
 
Article IV of The United Methodist Church Constitution, a foundation of our Book of Discipline, “Proclaims the value of each person as a unique child of God and commits itself to the healing and wholeness of all persons.” Our United Methodist Constitution further declares “that the sin of racism has been destructive to its unity throughout its history” and mandates the UMC “confront and seek to eliminate racism, whether in organizations or in individuals, in every facet of its life and in society at large.”  In our denomination, we experience this as white privilege including unconscious bias, colonialism, and xenophobia. 
 
“Now is not the time for calls to forgive or unify. Before we can have unity, we need healing. Before we can have healing, we need reconciliation. Before we can have reconciliation, we need repentance. Before we can honor repentance, we need confession! Until we the church, and its members can confess, it is our duty to resist the evil and injustices of racism and to name white supremacy’s attempts to re-center the needs of white people’s shame, guilt, and fragility.” Joey Lopez, MFSA Board of Directors
 
The statements that have been released by both the event leadership and the annual conference give the same weight to voices of white privilege as to the discrimination experienced by hispanic/latino/a/x young people; this perpetuates white supremacy and racism.  Civil rights activist and labor organizer Cesar Chavez said, “The fight is never about grapes or lettuce. It is always about people.” The words shared this weekend by latina student pastor Stacy Guinto-Salinas were not merely politics; they were a prophetic witness to what it means to be a people of faith seeking justice together. 
 
As an organization, MFSA will continue to educate our board and membership in anti-racism, bias, and white privilege. We commit to creating space for education and advocacy to publicly and actively resist white supremacy, white privilege and implicit bias for our membership and their communities.
 
In solidarity with the Hispanic/Latino Committee The North Carolina Conference of the United Methodist Church and the MARCHA Youth Consejo, we call upon MFSA communities, justice seeking people of faith, the Council of Bishops and conference leadership to:

  • Create Sanctuary churches
  • Invest time, money, and other resources to support the work of the General Commission on Religion and Race in your annual conference, local church and communities at large.
  • Speak and work against the narrative that privileged communities are being oppressed when they are asked to acknowledge the ways their privilege perpetuates bias and injustice. 
  • Prioritize and center the voices and experiences of marginalized communities in any conflict
  • Increase funding and institutional support for racial/ethnic ministries and new church starts. 

Experiences of injustice do not happen in a vacuum, and therefore it is imperative to: develop the most effective strategies to create space for understanding privilege; organize in an intersectional framework led by marginalized communities; and build effective systems of resistance and cooperation to take action for justice. We invite you to join us in this work.

May it be so,
The Staff and Board of Directors
Methodist Federation for Social Action
 

Press Release: Reproductive Health & Justice Faith Action Network

Thursday, September 29th, 2016
MFSA Board of Directors announces new Faith Action Network focusing on reproductive health, justice and choice. 
 

September 29, 2016
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Deaconess Darlene DiDomineck, Interim Executive Director; Irene DeMaris, Chair, Reproductive Health & Justice Faith Action Network

Washington, DC – The Board of Directors of the Methodist Federation for Social Action (MFSA) announced this week they have approved the formation of the first Reproductive Health & Justice Faith Action Network (FAN). This Faith Action Network is a way for United Methodist advocates for reproductive health, choice and justice to connect, stay informed and organize for change within our denomination and at local, state and national levels. 

This new Faith Action Network will be led by Irene DeMaris, MDIV who is a long time advocate for gender justice through a faith lens and previously served with MFSA as a seminary intern focusing on reproductive justice. DeMaris shares: “It’s more important than ever to begin this work for women and girls from a faith perspective. Our Wesleyan Heritage of social justice and our historic leadership of the Social Gospel Movement require us to take action, to stand with those who are oppressed. Having no United Methodist voice at the table for all parts of women's health, choice, and justice is dangerous.The MFSA has been walking with women from our founding and today, we further affirm that commitment through the creation of our Reproductive Health & Justice FAN!”

The 2016 General Conference of The United Methodist Church, instructed official United Methodist agencies including the General Board of Church and Society and United Methodist Women to withdraw immediately from membership in the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice (RCRC). This ended the denomination’s over 40-year relationship with the coalition, of which The United Methodist Church (UMC) was a founding member. As the remaining United Methodist voice, theMethodist Federation for Social Action (MFSA) must further our commitment to reproductive health, choice, and justice both within our denomination and at local, state, and national levels. For the first time since the 1970s, the MFSA voice is positioned to be the strongest United Methodist voice at the table for a women’s right to choose and the time is now for the MFSA and its supporters to be prophetic for women’s reproductive health. After General Conference 2016, many women and those who advocate for women’s health were utterly dismayed. This Faith Action Network will empower United Methodist advocates to be a collective voice for change. 

Ways to get involved:

Donate Today
 
 

Weeping with Rachel

Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

“Thus says YHWH: ‘A voice is heard in Ramah, mourning and bitter weeping. Rachel, weeping for her children, refuses to be comforted, for her children are no more.”  

- Jeremiah 31:15 (The Inclusive Bible)

Beloved MFSA Family,

Our hearts mourn acts of violence committed against black and brown bodies; our prayers join Rachel’s, and we too cry out into the wilderness refusing to be comforted for our children are no more.

In recent days we are once again in anguish but, cannot and will not let ourselves be paralyzed by our fear and feelings of helplessness. This is a time when we are called to listen more, learn more and lead more. We recall and reaffirm our baptismal vows to “accept the freedom and power God gives us to resist evil, injustice and oppression in whatever forms they present themselves.” We must continually live into our commitments and move to make justice ever more real in our own lives, congregations and communities.

Audre Lorde once said: “The master’s tools will never dismantle the master's house.” We need a new narrative and a new structure.  More importantly we need a new set of tools for us to build new houses.  The racism within our houses of worship, our houses of government and even the houses our movements reside within cannot be dismantled with the same tools we’ve used for centuries. It’s time to have a new conversation — a conversation that looks within our own movement first at the ways we continue to perpetuate a racist system. Only then will we be able to build a new house, one where the beloved community can call home.  

“Racism is the combination of the power to dominate by one race over other races and a value system that assumes that the dominant race is innately superior to the others. Racism includes both personal and institutional racism. Personal racism is manifested through the individual expressions, attitudes, and/or behaviors that accept the assumptions of a racist value system and that maintain the benefits of this system. Institutional racism is the established social pattern that supports implicitly or explicitly the racist value system.” (Par 162.A 2012 Book of Discipline)

MFSA calls upon ourselves and our progressive partners, along with local churches, annual conferences, and all denominational bodies, to confess and condemn the sins of systemic and personal racism, and to engage in the hard work of repentance and reconciliation.  To assist in this, we recommend the resources and work of the General Commission on Religion and Race.

As an organization, MFSA will continue to educate our board and member leadership in anti-racism, bias, and white privilege. As we seek to increase racial diversity among decision-makers and prioritize anti-racism in our programs and ministry, we also will call The United Methodist Church, its general boards and agencies, and its leadership to join us in sacred change. In doing so, we hope to embody the beloved community to which Christ calls us.

The work for racial justice must go deeper than statements and endless pastoral letters. James Cone once said: “sympathy does not change the structures of injustice.” We invite you to partner with us in committing to listen more, learn more, and lead more. Linked here are resources to help you and your communities begin and continue to have conversations about race, racial justice, and white privilege as well as organizations committed to racial justice that you might consider partnering with locally.

 
Seeking Justice,  
Your Staff and Board of Directors
Methodist Federation for Social Action

MFSA Mourns the Passing of Civil Rights Leader Evelyn Lowery

Friday, September 27th, 2013

The Methodist Federation for Social Action joins with so many other United Methodists and civil rights advocates who today are grieving the death of Evelyn G. Lowery, founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Women, Inc. As a sister organization to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, SCLC/WOMEN was founded to champion the rights of women, children, and families, and respond to the needs of disenfranchised people.  Mrs. Lowery was the creator of the “Drum Major of Justice Awards” which are held annually in Atlanta, GA, and the Evelyn G. Lowery Civil Rights Heritage Tour, a two-day tour retracing the events of the civil rights movement throughout Alabama.  Mrs. Lowery was responsible for getting 13 monuments erected paying tribute to many of the icons of the civil rights movement.  Our prayers and condolences go out to Evelyn’s husband and United Methodist clergyperson,The Reverend Dr. Joseph Lowery, and the entire Lowery family.  In a statement yesterday, Rev. Lowery shared these words of tribute: 

"My beloved Evelyn was a special woman, whose life was committed to service, especially around the issues of empowering women. She was a wonderful mother and wife and I thank God that she didn't suffer any pain and that I was blessed having her as my partner, my confidant and my best friend for close to 70 years. I will miss her each and every day, but as a man of faith, I know that she is with her God. My entire family has been overwhelmed by the continuous outpourings of love, support and prayers that have come from across the country and we ask for your continued prayers over the next few days."

Today, our hearts are heavy, but our faith reminds us that “joy comes in the morning” and that even in the midst of grief, we can give thanks. Our gratitude flows because we trust that “when the battle is over” (the life of faith, hope, and work of justice for all people), “we’re going home.”  Thank you Evelyn Lowery, good and faithful servant of Christ and inspiration to us all!  We trust that God's wide arms are welcoming you home.

 

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Since 1907, the Methodist Federation for Social Action has worked to mobilize, lead, and sustain a progressive movement, energizing people to be agents of God’s justice, peace, and reconciliation. As an independent, faith-based organization, MFSA leads both Church and society on issues of peace, poverty, people’s rights, progressive issues, and justice within The United Methodist Church.

Our Response to “An Open Letter to Liberal and Progressive Friends”

Friday, October 5th, 2012

WASHINGTON, DC – October 5, 2012 – On October 1st, the United Methodist News Service published a blog post entitled An Open Letter to Liberal or Progressive Friends by A. W. Martin.  In the post the author, Bill, refers to himself as “a long-time member of the Methodist Federation for Social Action (MFSA) and the Reconciling Ministries Network” (RMN).  Bill then goes on to talk about the frustration and futility that he has experienced as a United Methodist in working on trying to get the denomination to change the prejudicial statements against our Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgendered and Queer (LGBTQ)  church members over the last forty years.  He then outlines two possible scenarios for the future: 1) to stay in the denomination with and “hoping against hope that in another generation or two or three our views will triumph;” or, 2) to take one of two “paths” to depart the denomination “in a well-planned, organized way that allows inclusive congregations to stay together, and, one hopes, to thrive.” The later seems to be what Bill is advocating for.

In his concluding paragraph, the Rev. Martin writes, “My liberal brothers and sisters, some of our conservative friends have extended their hands to help us depart in an amicable way. Some of us may decline the offer even as we shake their hands. For others of us, it is time, as we also shake their hands, to express our thanks, accept their help, move out, and move on.” I can only assume that Bill is referencing the 2004 proposal by Bill Hinson (then president of the ultra conservative Confessing Movement) made at the Good News breakfast during General Conference in Pittsburgh, that "the time has come when we must begin to explore an amicable and just separation that will free us both from the cycle of pain and conflict. Such a just separation will protect the property rights of churches and the pension rights of clergy. It will also free us to reclaim our high calling and to fulfill our mission in the world."

Please note that “Liberal groups rejected the idea. The Common Witness Coalition” — which was then comprised of Affirmation, the Methodist Federation for Social Action, and the Reconciling Ministries Network — was quoted in a news report as "not in favor of a schism and . . . fully committed to inclusion of all opinions."

Also, the Rev. A. W. Martin neglected to mention another possible scenario that has been gaining traction and is formally being discussed as one of several options for the future within the United Methodist Church in the Northeastern, North Central and Western Jurisdictions.  That is, that entire Annual Conferences or Jurisdictions may vote to reorganize outside of the UMC as an autonomous affiliate church, thus retaining their Methodist theology and heritage while gaining doctrinal independence from the General Conference of the UMC.

Yes, A. W. Martin is a long-time member of MFSA and RMN. MFSA is always grateful for members who speak out against injustice and oppression and we support Bill’s call to do so in his open letter.  However, we also want to clarify that his letter was not written or endorsed by MFSA, nor was our opinion sought. Thank you, Bill, for opening the dialogue. The following is MFSA’s statement in response and we ask that readers read, pray and respond as well so that dialogue will continue.

“At the Methodist Federation for Social Action offices in Washington DC and Detroit, our opinion has not changed from 2004.  We are not in favor of schism and are faithful to our ongoing mission of creating a place for progressive Methodists to work for peace and justice.

We recognize that the divisions within our United Methodist Church have caused harm, great pain and hardship for many, especially those that the denomination continues to prejudicially exclude. And while we do encourage open discussions about our future together as a denomination, we have and will not endorse one particular way of Methodists to be in connection with each other.  To do so, we believe, would be a violation of our Wesleyan heritage and traditions of openness and democracy.

When the Methodist Episcopal Churches, both North and South started talking about re-unification, MFSA did not take a position on the merits of unity verses separation.  We did, however, oppose the racist construct of creating a separate and segregated Central Jurisdiction for predominantly Black Methodist Episcopal congregations.  When the Civil Rights, Gender Equality and Anti-war Movements came to a head in the 1960’s and 70’s, we did not advocate for formal separation within the Methodist Episcopal Church of the day.  Instead, we worked toward creating a new United Methodist Church that was free of its segregated past and would continue to work toward becoming a denomination that embraced racial and gender equality as well as being an advocate for peace with justice.  Our history is our evidence… we do not promote schism, but we will not be silent about issues of social holiness/justice for the sake of false and thereby meaningless unity.

The world is changing all around us and we believe that we need to offer a voice of Christ-like love and hope for the future of a Grace-filled Methodist movement in it.  While we understand, support and grieve the frustrations and departures of many good and faithful individual United Methodists who simply cannot abide by the continued prejudice and harm that has been codified in our polity around LGBTQ persons, we are in this work for the long haul (as we have been since 1907).

As a national and international organization, MFSA continues to work among Methodists who celebrate the unshakeable and inseparable connections that exist in our Wesleyan calling to both personal and social holiness.  We recognize that this is the core nature of our Wesleyan faith: a calling that we each receive through God's grace; celebrate and discern corporately in worship; and, live out in our connectedness in the world through our churches, conferences and worldwide structures.  Therefore, MFSA will continue to be a presence in Methodism, to ALL Methodists, regardless of any changes that may or may not come to the United Methodist denomination and/or system of polity.

We at MFSA continue to work with and pray for Methodists all over the world, that we might one day fully embrace the gift God has given us as a people of faith.  A gift that calls us to celebrate and live out a life in a way that personal and social holiness walk together in the light of God’s Love and Grace for all; and, attempts to subjugate one by the other cease.”

Since 1907, the Methodist Federation for Social Action has worked to mobilize, lead, and sustain a progressive movement, energizing people to be agents of God’s justice, peace, and reconciliation. As an independent, faith-based organization, MFSA leads both Church and society on issues of peace, poverty, people’s rights, progressive issues, and justice within The United Methodist Church.

 

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National Office:212 East Capitol St., NE,Washington, DC 20003 * tel: 202.546.8806 *email: mfsa@mfsaweb.org